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Wheelchair Accessible Things to do in Loch Lomond, The Trossachs & Stirling

Spending two days exploring Loch Lomond, The Trossachs National Park and Stirling is a great way to make the most of your time in Scotland’s first national park. There is so much to see and do, but in this guide, I’ll share my two day itinerary with some of the best wheelchair accessible things to do in Loch Lomond, The Trossachs and Stirling.

Before embarking on this two day road trip, we spent one full day in Falkirk and enjoyed visiting some of the great wheelchair accessible things the Forth Valley town has to offer.

I recommend you check out the Falkirk itinerary and turn it into an epic 3 day trip taking in Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park.

So if you’re wondering how to spend those 2 days in Loch Lomond, The Trossachs and Stirling, you’ve come to the right place!

2 Days in Loch Lomond, The Trossachs National Park and Stirling

Let’s get started! Day one starts off in Stirling with some Scottish history before gradually making our way towards the heart of the Trossachs National Park.

Day two sees us waking up in Callander and then exploring some of the towns surrounding Stirling.

Day One in Stirling/Loch Lomond & the Trossachs National Park

Smith Art Gallery and Museum

Our morning started with a visit to Smith Art Gallery and Museum. I must admit, I’ve been to Stirling too many times to count, but I’ve never visited this museum before.

It is located in the heart of Stirling and admission is free, which makes it an accessible option for many people and families looking to enjoy a day out in Stirling and learn about its history.

Smith Art Gallery and Museum Stirling entrance. Emma is sat in her wheelchair at the front of the building.
Smith Art Gallery and Museum

This Victorian museum opened in 1874 and houses an impressive collection of over 40,000 objects and artworks. One of my nephew’s favourites was the lifesize tiger covered in M&S teacake wrappers.

Emma and a tiger wrapped in M&S teacake wrappers

Other objects include the world’s oldest football, and pre-historic whale bones and learn about William Wallace, King Robert the Bruce and the Wars of Independence.

Smith Art Gallery and Museum Robert Burns display
Scottish solider in the Smith Art Gallery and Museum Stirling

There are costumes for dress up and brass rubbing stations for kids to do colouring. My nephew and I also completed some word searches together with words relating to the museum and its artworks.

Emma and her young nephew at table doing a wordsearch together.
Emma and her nephew sitting watching a mini documentary in Smith Gallery and Museum.
Emma and her nephew in Smith Art Gallery and Museum

Once we had been around the museum, we stopped for lunch in The Gallery Cafe.

The Gallery Cafe was lovely and bright with the sunshine streaming through the high windows. I loved the green and yellow tiles and of course all the plants.

The cafe serves a selection of light lunches, snacks, and cakes. I ordered the hummus and avocado sandwich served with tortilla chips and salad. Allan had the vegan sausage in a roll. It was all lovely. Unfortunately, we didn’t have enough time for cakes.

Emma is sitting a table in Smith Cafe. She is looking off to the side. The cafe is bright with white, yellow and green tiles. Plants are displayed on the window ledge. Her dark hair is long and she is wearing a stripy jumper and mustard cord jacket.
Emma at The Gallery Cafe
A plate with vegan sausage sandwich and salad.
Lunch at The Gallery Cafe

It was a sunny morning when we arrived and before going inside we took time to explore the museum gardens.

Ailie’s Garden is a 2-acre biodiversity garden with plants, sculptures and exhibits such as the Gilbert and Sullivan Gate.

Smith Art Gallery and Museum Stirling gardens
Emma outside in the garden at Smith Art Gallery and Museum Stirling

Wheelchair access at Smith Art Gallery and Museum

Wheelchair access to Smith Art Gallery and Museum is via a ramp located at the side of the building. We rang the doorbell and within a few seconds, someone came and let us into the museum.

Emma driving her wheelchair up at wheelchair access to enter the Smith Art Gallery and Museum
Wheelchair accessible entrance via ramp

Although on the small side, I was able to move around easily within the galleries. Gallery Two and three are located on the same level as the wheelchair accessible entrance.

There are a few stairs down to Gallery One and the cafe, but I took the platform lift which accommodated my heavy power wheelchair (and my nephew on my lap) without an issue.

Emma sat in her power wheelchair on a wheelchair lift in the Smith Art Gallery and Museum. She is wearing a face mask, mustard cord jacket, black skinny jeans and khaki green boots.
Emma on the platform lift

The accessible toilet is located on the ground floor behind the reception area. It is quite small, which may not be suitable for larger wheelchairs.

Accessible toilet at Smith Art Gallery and Museum
Accessible toilet at Smith Art Gallery and Museum

Address: 40 Albert Pl, Stirling FK8 2RQ

Looking for something else to do in Stirling? Why not visit Stirling Castle?

Read more: Visiting Stirling Castle as a wheelchair user

Argaty Red Kites

We left Stirling and drove to the next stop on our itinerary, Argaty Red Kites. It’s a place we’ve always been interested to visit every time we drove through Doune on our way to Callandar. And finally, we got to visit the wonderful red kites.

Emma sat in her power wheelchair with her young nephew stood beside her. They are both looking up at the sky watching the red kites flying during feeding time at Argaty Red Kites centre.
Emma and her nephew watching the red kites

Argaty Red Kites is the only red kite feeding station in central Scotland. Visitors are able to visit the centre each day, but feeding only takes place once a day in the afternoon.

The red kites are completely wild so the staff are unable to predict how many birds will come and feed. But we were surprised to see over twenty of these beautiful birds when we visited.

Argaty Red Kites in Doune

Wheelchair access at Argaty Red Kites

There is a car park with disabled parking at the centre. Watching the red kites usually takes place at the bird hide, but due to covid, the viewing area for watching the red kites is in an open area on the farmland.

Access to the viewpoint is quite rough, uneven and muddy, which was manageable in my power wheelchair, but very bumpy.

Emma driving her wheelchair across a muddy track in a field at Argaty Red Kites centre.

The visitor centre is accessed via a ramp and there is space to move around inside. It’s a great opportunity to learn more about the red kites and grab a hot drink.

Emma and her nephew approaching the visitor centre at Argaty Red Kites centre.
Wheelchair ramp at Argaty Red Kites visitor centre
Emma and her nephew in the Argaty Red Kites visitor centre
Argaty Red Kites visitor centre

There is an accessible toilet next to the visitor centre. Although I didn’t use it, it did appear to be quite small for my wheelchair to fit inside.

Inside the disabled toilet at Argaty Red Kites
Inside the disabled toilet at Argaty Red Kites
Accessible toilet at Argaty Red Kites

Address: Lerrocks Farm, Doune FK16 6EJ

If you want to explore the Doune area a little further I would recommend visiting Doune Ponds. This local nature reserve is a beautiful place to visit and a great wheelchair accessible walk.

Read more: Doune Ponds | Wheelchair Accessible Walk in Doune, Perthshire

The Cabin at Loch Lubnaig

After watching the red kites feed, it was then time to make our way to Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park where we would be spending the night. But on our way, we stopped off at one of my favourite lochs, Loch Lubnaig.

The Cabin at Loch Lubnaig

The Cabin at Loch Lubnaig is located between Callander and Strathyre on the A84. It offers facilities including food/drink and toilets.

We enjoyed spending time there soaking up the evening’s sun. My nephew and Allan played along the shore and had a great time while I chatted to a group of friends who had just spent the day enjoying water activities.

Emma sat in her power wheelchair on the grass next to loch Lubnaig. The sun is shining and Emma has her eyes closed soaking up the sun.
Young child playing on Loch Lubnaig shore
Young child playing on Loch Lubnaig shore
Emma sat in her power wheelchair on the grass next to loch Lubnaig. Emma is smiling at the camera.
Enjoying the view across the shores of Loch Lubnaig

It was a beautiful day and the perfect place to enjoy a rest break with the most beautiful views across the shores of Loch Lubnaig.

There is accessible parking although those bays were coned off due to safety concerns as a result of covid queuing.

Alternative disabled blue badge parking bays are available next to the bins. It is quite difficult to see the sign for accessible parking though so if you look for the bins you should be able to find them.

Loch Lubnaig car park
Accessible parking

There is also an accessible toilet at The Cabin.

The Cabin at Loch Lubnaig disabled toilet
Accessible toilet at The Cabin at Loch Lubnaig

Dinner at Mhor 84

Whilst chatting to the group of friends at The Cabin I mentioned we were heading off for dinner at Mhor 84. Excitedly they told me how much we were in for a real treat. And they weren’t wrong.

Mhor 84 restaurant
Emma outside at Mhor 84

Mhor 84 is a motel, restaurant, bar and cafe located on the A84 road to the Highlands. As we entered we were immediately greeted by the friendly staff. We were shown to our table at the sunny window with views out to Balquidder glen.

Emma sat a table in Mhor 84 restaurant. She is smiling and looking down at the table. Sun is shining on her face.
Emma inside at Mhor 84

With rumbling tums we were ready to chow down on delicious food. Allan and I both ordered vegan pizzas. Margherita for Allan and Mediterranean with artichokes, sun blush tomato, roast red pepper and black olive for me. Crispy chicken, chips and peas for my nephew.

A table with two vegan pizzas and one plate with a kids meal.
Delicious vegan pizzas

It was all amazing! One of the best vegan pizzas we’ve had. It was so good we are already hoping to go back soon.

Two vegan chocolate brownies in a takeaway box with mountains as a view in the background.
Yummy vegan brownies

Unfortunately, we were too full for desserts, but we ordered two vegan chocolate orange brownies to take-away. They were also very nice!

Wheelchair access at Mhor 84

Mhor 84 is wheelchair accessible with a gentle ramped entrance into the restaurant. The table we sat at was a good height for me to roll my wheelchair under. Thankfully we were seated in a quiet spot so there wasn’t anyone sitting at the tables next to us, which makes me feel more comfortable in the current situation.

Disabled toilet in Mhor 84 restaurant.
Accessible toilet at Mhor 84

The accessible toilet was fairly spacious inside with a roll under sink. The toilet was relatively low with only one pull-down grab rail. The bins had foot pedals which solo wheelchair users may struggle to use.

Address: 84 Kingshouse, Balquhidder, Lochearnhead FK19 8NY

Overnight Stay at Callander CYP

After a great day exploring Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, it was time to unwind for the evening at our overnight accommodation at Callander CYP.

Although, it was dark when we arrived we were really looking forward to spending the night at Callander CYP.

The exterior of the Callander CYP Accessible Glamping Pod
Emma sat in her powered wheelchair outside on the pod decking looking across the fields to the mountains.
Emma admiring the view from the Crags accessible pod

There are four newly-built glamping pods onsite set in the most perfect spot with beautiful views of Ben Ledi and the Callander Crags. We stayed in the Crags accessible pod which was fantastic.

Although we have stayed in glamping pods before this is the first one we’ve come across with a Changing Places style wetroom. How amazing is that?

The bathroom was massive with a shower, changing bench, adjustable-height washbasin and clos-o-mat toilet. I really wish more accessible accommodations would install these wash and dry toilets as they are vital for many disabled people.

Changing Places bathroom at Callander CYP Accessible Pod
Changing Places style wetroom

There is one bedroom with a profiling bed which I found very comfortable. The ceiling (y-shape) hoist runs through to the bathroom from the bedroom.

A single profiling bed with overhead ceiling track hoist in the accessible glamping pod at Callander CYP.
The bedroom and bathroom inside the accessible glamping pod in Callander CYP.
Bedroom in the Crags accessible pod

The sofa bed in the lounge can sleep two people and we were provided with a Z bed too so the pod can accommodate different sleeping setup depending on how many people are staying etc.

Lounge area with a view into the bedroom area at Callander CYP Accessible Glamping Pod
Lounge area

The accessible pod also has a fully equipped kitchen, underfloor heating and a private covered porch with a table and chairs.

Kitchen an dining area in the accessible glamping pod at Callander CYP.
Kitchen and dining area
Emma sat in her powered wheelchair inside the accessible pod at Callander CYP.
Emma inside the Crags accessible pod

Read my full review of Crags Accessible Pod here.

Address: Callander Youth Project Trust, Callander Hostel, 6 Bridgend, Callander, FK17 8AH

Day Two in Stirling & Clackmannanshire

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience is a great place to visit to learn about Scottish history in a fun and interactive way. The visitor experience is brought to life with the 3D battle simulation which really transforms the way visitors learn about Bannockburn. My nephew particularly enjoyed the 3D experience which is a great way for kids to learn.

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre
The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

We enjoyed hearing from both the English and Scottish sides, learning about the reasons for the battle, the choices of ground, the strategies and seeing the armour and weaponry.

The one hour tour was super interesting and we had a great tour guide who was incredibly knowledgeable. He was great at presenting, keeping everyone engaged and making it fun for the children in the group.

The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre
The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre
The Battle of Bannockburn 3D Experience

After the tour, we were able to wander the grounds and visit the cafe and gift shop. We went outside to explore the grounds and visit the statue of King Robert Bruce.

Emma sat in her power wheelchair at The Battle of Bannockburn memorial.
Emma sat in her wheelchair photographed from the back. She is facing towards the statue of King Robert Bruce.
Statue of King Robert Bruce
The grounds outside The Battle of Bannockburn showing important dates of the battle.
The Battle of Bannockburn Experience memorial statue

The way to the statue is via a wheelchair accessible tarmacked path with a very gentle incline. There is signage explaining the battle and there is also a central memorial with a poem engraved.

The Battle of Bannockburn memorial with 'Here Lies Our Land: Every Airt' engraved in the wood.

The poem reads:

“Here lies our land, every airt, beneath swift clouds, glad glints of sun, belonging to none but itself. We are mere transients, who sing its westlin winds and ferny braes, northern lights and siller tides; small folk playing our part. “Come all ye,” the country says, “you win me, who take me most to heart.”

Wheelchair access at The Battle of Bannockburn Experience

Wheelchair access at The Battle of Bannockburn Experience is very good. We parked in an accessible parking bay at the front of the building and entered via automatic doors. The entrance was level-access and brings you into the gift shop and ticket desk.

The tour rooms had surround video and audio which enhance the experience. I didn’t have difficulty moving around the rooms in my wheelchair, though I just took my time and was careful as it is dark in the rooms due to the video nature of the experience.

The tour guide didn’t draw attention to my access needs in any way, but he made sure I had enough time and space to manoeuvre.

Although I didn’t grab a photo at the time, there is an accessible toilet in The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre.

Inside The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre
Toilet in The Battle of Bannockburn Experience visitor centre

Address: Glasgow Road, Whins Of Milton, Stirling FK7 0LJ

The Japanese Garden at Cowden

The Japanese Garden at Cowden is a stunning visitor attraction located in Dollar, Clackmannanshire. It is a great place to visit while exploring the Stirling area as it’s only around 15 miles away.

The Japanese Garden at Cowden

It was first created in 1908 before closing to the public in 1955. Since 2013 it has gradually been restored by Professor Masao Fukuhara from Osaka University of Arts, Japan. The gardens are immaculate and beautiful. It really is a gorgeous setting.

Emma sat in her wheelchair on the grass in the Japanese gardens. She is looking out across the pond in the middle of the garden.
A Japanese wooden structure positioned the water edge and surrounded by plants and trees.

It was very peaceful as we strolled around the garden admiring the unique plants and trees which would be found in a typical Japanese garden as well as some from Scotland too. It’s a fusion of the two cultures.

There are also structures and bridges with Japanese cultural significance. The lake in the centre of the garden is beautiful and provides the perfect opportunity to sit back, relax and take it all in.

The Japanese Garden at Cowden
Emma sat in her wheelchair underneath a Japanese structure. Emma is wearing an orange fluffy jacket, black jeans and black boots. She is smiling. The stunning gardens are behind Emma.

Wheelchair access at The Japanese Garden at Cowden

I visited the Japanese Garden a few years ago when work was in progress so there were areas that I felt could be improved. I’m happy to see some of the bumpy paths have now been covered with light gravel, which I found manageable in my power wheelchair.

However, the light gravel might be tricky for some wheelchairs and mobility aids, so please keep that in mind. I hope seeing the photos helps give you an idea if it would work for you in terms of access.

Emma driving her wheelchair through The Japanese Garden at Cowden
Emma driving her wheelchair through The Japanese Garden at Cowden
Paths around The Japanese Garden at Cowden

There is also a good size accessible toilet in the visitor centre. This has also been improved since my previous visit as the accessible toilet used to be outside in a large green cabin.

The accessible toilet has grab rails but only one pull-down grab rail next to the toilet. There was an emergency cord with a Euan’s Guide red cord card hanging on it. There was a baby changing unit in the accessible toilet, which the staff offered to remove to give us more space.

Inside the disabled toilet at The Japanese Garden at Cowden
Accessible toilet at The Japanese Garden at Cowden

Disabled parking bays are available in the car park which has hard compacted gravel. The path from the car park to the visitor centre and entrance via a short path with a gentle incline.

Emma's wheelchair accessible vehicle parked in the car park at The Japanese Garden at Cowden
Accessible parking at The Japanese Garden at Cowden

Read more: Visiting The Japanese Garden at Cowden In A Wheelchair

Address: Upper Hillfoot Rd, Dollar FK14 7PL

Afternoon tea at Inglewood House

After a lovely time at The Japanese Garden at Cowden, it was time for Afternoon Tea at Inglewood House in Alloa.

Inglewood House & Spa Hotel is a lavish former mansion from 1901, set on 25 acres of parkland. The hotel offers luxury rooms as well as self-catering woodland lodges. Amenities include a spa, a salon and a gym.

Emma sitting at the table in Inglewood House. She is wearing a lilac cardigan and is smiling at the camera. A three tier cake stand with Afternoon Tea is sat in front of her.
Emma waiting patiently to enjoy her Afternoon tea

Our visit to Inglewood House was to enjoy vegan Afternoon Tea, which did not disappoint.

The three-tier stand was filled with yummy treats for three people.

The top tier had a selection of cakes including rocky road, fruit cakes and shortbread. Fresh scones, jam and fruit on the second tier and an assortment of sandwiches on the bottom tier. Plus a plate of vegan sausage rolls.

It was all so good. The quality and quantity were amazing – we ended up taking some home with us as we couldn’t finish it all. The staff were all lovely and super friendly.

Wheelchair access at Inglewood House

As you arrive at Inglewood House you will immediately find parking at the front of the hotel. There are stairs up to the entrance and it can be a little confusing as to how to get in if you are a wheelchair user. However, the accessible entrance is at the back of the hotel and there is also parking there too.

This entrance is level access and through a set of double doors, which may be a little tricky to open and roll through if you are on your own.

Emma smiling at the camera whilst outside the wheelchair accessible entrance to Inglewood House for afternoon tea.
Wheelchair accessible entrance at Inglewood House

Once inside you will enter the lobby and reception area. A large accessible toilet can also be found just off from the lobby/close to the wheelchair accessible entrance.

Inside the disabled toilet at Inglewood House.
Accessible toilet at Inglewood House

Address: Tullibody Road, Alloa, Clackmannanshire, FK10 2HU

Affinity Sterling Mills Outlet Shopping

The last stop on our Stirling and Loch Lomond and The Trossachs itinerary was seven miles from Inglewood House to Sterling Mills.

Sterling Mills Outlet Shopping Village is set in a really nice location at the foot of the Ochil Hills. It’s a good place to visit if you are looking for a bargain from some of your favourite brands.

Free car parking is available with many disabled parking bays positioned close to the shops. The paths are wide and step-free for a comfortable experience. There is also a free wheelchair hire service for customers which includes manual wheelchairs and electric scooters.

Address: The Devon Way, Tillicoultry FK13 6HQ

Loch Lomond, Trossachs, Stirling & Forth Valley

So there you have it, a 2 day itinerary packed with some of the best wheelchair accessible things to do in Stirling, Loch Lomond & the Trossachs. I hope you find this guide helpful when planning your accessible trip to Scotland.

Remember to check out Access Forth Valley for more itineraries and accessibility information for your visit to the Forth Valley area. Everything from heritage, family, outdoor, transport and more www.accessforthvalley.com

Also, be sure to read my guide to visiting Falkirk and how you can spend the day visiting the wheelchair accessible things to do in Falkirk.

You might also enjoy

Visiting The Japanese Garden at Cowden In A Wheelchair

Stirling Castle Wheelchair Accessible Review

Wheelchair Accessible Glamping in Callander | The Crags Accessible Pod Review

Wheelchair Accessible Cruises on the Iconic Steamship Sir Walter Scott at Loch Katrine

Visiting Edinburgh Castle in a Wheelchair

Doune Ponds | Wheelchair Accessible Walk in Doune, Perthshire

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Disclaimer: This guide is in collaboration with Visit Falkirk, Discover Clackmannanshire, Your Stirling and Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park, but as always, all words are my own and 100% honest.

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Meet Emma

Hello I’m Emma. My mission is to show you the possibilities of accessible travel through my travel guides, tips and reviews. I also share personal stories, live event reviews and more.

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5 Responses

  1. At Sterling Mills where do you hire wheelchairs or scooters. I am there all the time and have never seen anywhere. I notice that you never mentioned the disabled toilet which is a joke. No grab rails, very small, not very well signed as it is within normal toilets. Only good thing about Sterling Mills is lots of disabled parking.

    Inglewood House must have got disabled toilet put in as they never used to have one. I am going there on Tuesday after a funeral for a wake and will find out what it is like but going by photos I am going to struggle as only one grab rail to help with transfer onto toilet. The one on the wall too far. Needs to be same as the folding one

    Your Powerchair must be better than mine as mine can’t go over the gravel at the Japanese Garden, kept on wheel spinning. My Powerchair left grooves in the gravel. Left after five minutes as was getting nowhere

    1. Hi Elizabeth. Wheelchairs and scooters can be collected from Reception at the Management Suite at Sterling Mills. To reserve a wheelchair in advance of the visit, they advise calling 01259 233982. Yes, I didn’t comment on the toilet or get a photo for that matter because I didn’t go to the accessible toilets, so couldn’t comment on what they are like. Thanks for sharing your experience with them.

      I am not sure when Inglewood House got an accessible toilet, but it was there when I visited – this was my first visit to the hotel so I don’t know what the facilities were like before that. But this is why I share photos of things like accessible toilets so my readers can see what the facilities are like before they visit and decide if it will work for them or not. I’m glad the photo of the accessible toilet at Inglewood House although not suitable for your needs, has let you know what to expect when you visit. I really wish everywhere was completely accessible for everyone i.e changing places toilets etc.

      Is your wheelchair mid-wheel drive or rear wheel drive? I definitely think some wheelchairs would struggle with the light gravel. Thankfully, I found it manageable.

  2. Hi Emma! I had known about the accessible pod in Callander for some time and reading this blog post has inspired me to book it! I’m not going until next year but it will be my first time visiting Scotland, and I’m so excited! Xx

    1. Hi Lisa. I’m absolutely delighted you have booked a stay at the accessible pod in Callander – you will love it! It really means a lot to me to know that my post has inspired you to visit. I really hope you love Scotland and that it won’t be your last visit up here 🙂 Have an incredible adventure! xx

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