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Linlithgow Loch, A Wheelchair Accessible Walk in West Lothian, Scotland

Scotland has so many lovely areas to explore and I’m lucky to call it home. With shielding now paused I’ve taken advantage of the good weather and enjoyed a couple of nice drives to places like Carron Valley Reservoir. Our most recent outing was to Linlithgow Loch, a wheelchair accessible walk in West Lothian, Scotland.

Linlithgow Palace and Loch

Linlithgow gives me all the feels of my childhood when my parents would take my sisters and me a ‘run in the car’ on a summers night. We would feed the ducks, play in the park, walk up to Linlithgow Palace before getting chips and a ‘99’ ice cream cone.

Emma around the age of 3 with her dad and sister at Linlithgow Loch.
Emma is around the age of 2 or 3 with her Dad and sister at Linlithgow Loch.

Ah, those were the days. But even now as an adult, I still enjoy a visit to Linlithgow Loch. Nowadays I take my nephew and hope to carry on those childhood memories with him. He loves it too.

Linlithgow is a small town in West Lothian, Scotland with so much history. Most known for the Palace and birthplace of Mary Queen of Scots, who became queen at six days old after her father King James V of Scotland died.

Well, I can’t promise that you’ll feel like a Royal visiting this ancient town, but I can promise you a beautifully tranquil wander around the grounds of Linlithgow Palace and Loch.

A Wheelchair Accessible Walk Around Linlithgow Loch

It’s not a huge car park and it was quite full when we arrived, but we found a parking bay in St Ninian’s Way car park. Once parked, you can either turn right and head towards Linlithgow Palace which involves some steep paths or take a left and enjoy a flatter walk around the loch.

Emma in her powered wheelchair. She is sitting next to Linlithgow Loch under a willow tree. The sky is clear blue. Linlithgow Loch surrounded by trees. The sky is blue with fluffy white clouds.Emma in her powered wheelchair. She is sitting next to Linlithgow Loch under. Emma is looking down to the side and smiling. A close up of ducks in Linlithgow Loch Emma in her powered wheelchair. She is sitting next to Linlithgow Loch under. Emma is looking down to the side and smiling.Emma sitting in her wheelchair with her back to the camera. She is sitting next the loch under a willow tree.

We started off by turning left as I was keen to explore and see how far we could make it around the Loch before encountering any access issues.

There is a wide range of trees, including my favourite, the Willow tree (which we named one of our kittens after). The trees line the paths on both sides and it’s really lovely.

For the most part, the pathways are grand. A mix of tarmac and hard compacted fine gravel which would be ideal in both wet or dry conditions.

A low level shot of the loch and path with willow trees overhanging in the background.
A flat tarmac path with trees lining each side.
A flat tarmac path with trees lining each side.
A gravel path around the loch.
Emma driving her wheelchair across a wooden bridge.
Emma sitting next to a pale blue wooden gate with a thistle emblem on it. There are lots of green trees and shrubs around her.

Linlithgow Palace sits on the hill overlooking the loch surrounded by lots of greenery. I love how you can enjoy views of the Palace across the Loch the entire way around the 2.3-mile circular loop.

The loch and Linlithgow Palace in the background. The loch and Linlithgow Palace in the background out of focus. The main focus of the image is the plants and berry bushes. The loch and Linlithgow Palace in the background. The loch and Linlithgow Palace in the background. The loch and Linlithgow Palace in the background.

There are two ‘cattle style gates’ to go through, which I managed to access in my power wheelchair. I also saw a manual wheelchair user in front of me who was able to get through the gates as well. I can’t be 100% certain, but it may be slightly more difficult for powered scooter users that are larger in size.

Emma driving her wheelchair through 'cattle gates' with her nephew walking beside her. Emma in her wheelchair driving away from the camera with the palace in the far background.

Going through the second gate takes you onto a path with a road alongside. This street is called Blackness Road and there is a lane on the right that we went down, which is on a slight slope. This took us to the grassy area below Linlithgow Palace.

A close up shot of Linlithgow Palace. Vibrant green grass and clear blue sky frame the Palace.

There are paths up to the Palace but we continued walking on the lower section beside the water. We were able to look up to the Palace the entire time. We then followed the sloped paths down to the Loch level.

Emma looking down at her box of chips and smiling. She is holding a metal straw and piercing her chips with it because she doesn't have a fork.

We sat in the sun eating our chips from the Golden Chip and it was great. I usually have cutlery in my bag, but for some reason, it wasn’t in there. So because I can’t lift my arms up to my mouth, I used my metal straw instead and although it took a lot of patience to pierce each chip (the chips kept breaking), it worked great as a fork alternative.

It was the perfect way to end a perfect day reliving my childhood with Allan, my Mum and my nephew.

Final Thoughts

A walk around Linlithgow Palace and Loch make for a lovely day or evening. I particularly enjoy it when the weather is a little warmer. Linlithgow is an ancient town and many of the shops that line the streets are on a smaller scale, so wheelchair access may be a little tricky at times.

I haven’t visited inside Linlithgow Palace since my childhood (before I was a power wheelchair user), so I can’t comment on the accessibility at this time. This Euan’s Guide review is very helpful though. However, I’m happy to share my thoughts and experience of the walk around the Loch which I found to be manageable and pleasant in my wheelchair. If you are looking for a wheelchair accessible scenic walk with lots of wildlife, then you may want to consider Linlithgow Loch.

Have you been to Linlithgow Loch? Do you have a favourite wheelchair accessible walk?

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Linlithgow Loch, A Wheelchair Accessible Walk in West Lothian, Scotland
Linlithgow Loch, A Wheelchair Accessible Walk in West Lothian, Scotland

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Meet Emma

Hello I’m Emma. My mission is to show you the possibilities of accessible travel through my travel guides, tips and reviews. I also share personal stories, live event reviews and more.

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